What Will Decide Your Vote?

  • February 27, 2015 13:30
  • Sarah Thrift

It's The Economy, Stupid: Economics for Voters

By Vicky Pryce, Andy Ross & Peter Urwin

PB RRP: £15.99 Our Price: £12 

eBook RRP: £12.99 Our Price: £7.79

"Without economics you can vote but you are really disenfranchised. You will be an innocent, subject to manipulation by vested interests using economic smoke and mirrors to pull the wool over your eyes." (Chapter 1: The Importance of Being Economists) 

Three leading experts make economics accessible and interesting in this vital contribution to our general election reading list.

"You’d struggle to name a more coherent account of the credit crunch." The Telegraph

 

Psst... We're also offering a great deal on Vicky Pryce's Greekonomics. Yours for just £2.99 today.

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The NHS: Things That Need To Be Said – Available Now

  • February 20, 2015 12:30
  • Sarah Thrift

It's time for a grown-up debate about the NHS 

The NHS: Things That Need To Be Said

By Iain Dale

Published by Elliott & Thompson

Yours for just £8.99*

Political pundit and broadcaster Iain Dale tackles the issues of the NHS head-on in this sharp, intelligent polemic. Dale addresses ongoing problems with refreshing candour, saying the unsayable and encouraging readers to consider the 'undoable'. A must-read for anyone who works in the NHS – or who uses it. 
Read a sample from the book.

 

 

Part of the LBC series

*1st Class P&P for just £1.25

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The Problem With Immigrants - Available Now

  • February 13, 2015 13:00
  • Sarah Thrift

An essential voice in the immigration debate

The Problem With ImmigrantsDerek Laud 

Paperback RRP: £14.99  Our Price: £11.99
eBook        RRP: £11.99   Our Price: £8.00
 
The topic of immigration is never far from the news, and indeed some consider it the most important subject facing the country today. Derek Laud, tired of seeing immigration getting the blame for everything, has set out to challenge the misconceptions with this thought-provoking, refreshing contribution. 
Read an extract from the book: Chapter 1, Surfing the wave  
 
"Laud's is an important voice, telling the other story of immigration to the UK."
Yasmin Alibhai-Brown
 

 

We now offer FREE UK POSTAGE for Biteback Publishing & The Robson Press books on all orders of £20 or over. 

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Seat by Seat - An eBook-only Exclusive

  • February 06, 2015 13:00
  • Sarah Thrift

Seat by Seat: A Political Anorak's Guide to Potential Gains and Losses in the 2015 General Election 

RRP: £1.99 Our Price: £1.59

Enjoyed The Politicos Guide to the 2015 General Election? On the hunt for election predictions? Political commentator Iain Dale has compiled an unbeatable anorak's guide to potential gains and losses in the 2015 general election – Seat by Seat. This eBook-only exclusive is a must for keen politicos. Read an introduction to Seat by Seat here. Not purchased an eBook from us before? Here's our handy how-to guide

We've lined up some great books for your pre-election reading. Take a look at our recommendations.
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Political Book Awards Winners

  • January 29, 2015 11:00
  • Sarah Thrift

THE VOTES ARE IN …

MATTHEW GOODWIN AND ROBERT FORD WIN POLITICAL BOOK OF THE YEAR.
ANDREW MARR WINS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD.

Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain by academics Matthew Goodwin and Robert Ford, published by Routledge, won the Political Book of the Year tonight at the Paddy Power Political Book Awards. The glittering ceremony, which was hosted by impressionist and comedian Rory Bremner and held at the BFI IMAX, was attended by a select audience of authors, publishers and politicians. A cheque for £10,000 was donated and presented to the winning author by Lord Ashcroft KCMG PC. The book was up against fierce competition in a category that included Please, Mister Postman by Alan Johnson (Bantam Press), The Snowden Files by Luke Harding (Guardian Faber), Smile For the Camera by Simon Danczuk and Matthew Baker (Biteback Publishing), Margot At War by Anne de Courcy (Weidenfeld & Nicolson), Napoleon the Great by Andrew Roberts (Allen Lane) and Parliament: The Biography by Chris Bryant (Doubleday). The judges for this category, Lord Ashcroft KCMG PC, Professor Mary Beard, Keith Simpson MP, Lord Adonis and Ann Treneman reached a unanimous decision when they met to choose the winner. They agreed that Revolt on the Right is ‘a ground-breaking book which provides essential and enjoyable reading for anyone who wants to understand the shifts in modern politics. Their story relies on an impressive amount of data and their analysis has been borne out by recent events.’ Lord Ashcroft commented, ‘Revolt on the Right is an insightful book which is scholarly and analytical yet accessible and readable at the same time. It is a superbly timed work that does exactly what it says on the tin, charting the reasons for the rise of UKIP as a political force. Once again, I am delighted to have supported this prestigious event.’

Roy Jenkins: A Well-Rounded Life by John Campbell (Jonathan Cape) won Political Biography of the Year. The award was presented by Catherine Colloms Director of Corporate Affairs for headline sponsor Paddy Power. She commented: ‘Paddy Power is delighted to be involved with the Political Book Awards for the third year running. Biography was a particularly strong category this year so it was with great pleasure that I presented this award to John Campell for his wonderful and revealing biography of Roy Jenkins.’ Other titles on the shortlist were The Churchill Factor by Boris Johnson (Hodder & Stoughton), Sailing Close to the Wind by Dennis Skinner (Quercus), Right or Wrong: The Memoirs of Lord Bell by Tim Bell (Bloomsbury Continuum), Coming Up Trumps by Jean Trumpington (Macmillan) and Clement Attlee by Michael Jago (Biteback Publishing).

Winner of the Political History Book of the Year, in association with News UK, was Modernity Britain Book Two: A Shake of the Dice (1959–62) by David Kynaston (Bloomsbury). The award was presented by David Dinsmore, editor of The Sun.

The Debut Political Book of the Year was won by Ramita Navai, author of City of Lies: Love, Sex, Death and the Search for Truth in Tehran (Weidenfeld & Nicolson). Journalist and presenter Faisal Islam presented the winning author with a cheque for £3,000, kindly donated by Lord Ashcroft.

Women of the World: The Rise of the Female Diplomat by Helen McCarthy (Bloomsbury) won the International Affairs Book of the Year. Andrew Mitchell MP presented her with the award.

Practical Politics Book of the Year was won by Charles Clarke MP for The ‘Too Difficult’ Box: The Big Issues Politicans Can’t Crack (Biteback Publishing). He was presented with the award by broadcaster and journalist Andrew Neil.

Martin Rowson’s The Coalition Book (SelfMadeHero) won Political Humour and Satire Book of the Year. The award was presented by the French Ambassador, Her Excellency Sylvie Bermann.

Political Fiction Book of the Year was won by former BBC reporter Terry Stiastny for her first novel, Acts of Omission (John Murray). She was presented with her prize by journalist and broadcaster Victoria Derbyshire.

Geoffrey Robertson QC won Polemic of the Year for his book An Inconvenient Genocide: Who Now Remembers the Armenians? (Biteback Publishing). He was presented with his award by Mr Speaker, John Bercow.

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War One, a special category was added to the awards this year. The World War One Book of the Year was won by David Olusoga for his book The World’s War (Head of Zeus). Professor Mary Beard presented him with the award.

Finally, the Lifetime Achievement Award for Political Writing was presented to journalist, broadcaster and author Andrew Marr. His colleague on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, producer Barney Jones, presented him with the award.

Iain Dale, founder of the awards, said: ‘2015 is a massive year for everyone in politics, and by definition anyone who writes about it. The role of these awards in showcasing and encouraging the finest political writing has never been more significant. These are the books that have helped shape our thinking and will continue to do so right up to the general election and beyond.’

For more information please contact Suzanne Sangster on 07717 536 498 or 020 7091 1260 suzanne.sangster@politicalbookawards.com

WINNERS

Political Book of the Year

Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain by Robert Ford & Matthew Goodwin (Routledge)

Polemic of the Year

An Inconvenient Genocide: Who Now Remembers the Armenians? by Geoffrey Robertson QC (Biteback Publishing)

International Affairs Book of the Year

Women of the World: The Rise of the Female Diplomat by Helen McCarthy (Bloomsbury Publishing)

Political History Book of the Year

Modernity Britain: Book Two: A Shake of the Dice 1959–62 by David Kynaston (Bloomsbury Publishing)

Political Biography of the Year

Roy Jenkins by John Campbell (Jonathan Cape)

World War One Book of the Year

The World's War by David Olusoga (Head of Zeus)

Political Humour and Satire Book of the Year

The Coalition Book by Martin Rowson (SelfMadeHero)

Debut Political Book of the Year

City of Lies: Love, Sex, Death and the Search for Truth in Tehran by Ramita Navai (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

Political Fiction Book of the Year

Acts of Omission by Terry Stiastny (John Murray)

Practical Politics Book of the Year

The ‘Too Difficult’ Box by Charles Clarke (Biteback Publishing)

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